Tag: FL及其他 – 爱上海

June 18, 2021

New AGF program helps clients transition to post-retirement

Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news IE Staff Keywords RetirementCompanies AGF Management Ltd. New CI fund to invest in “longevity economy” RBC GAM updates retirement portfolios Toronto-based AGF Investments Inc. has launched an all-inclusive retirement and income online program, Retire Smart, designed to address the needs of Canada’s baby boomers. As part of AGF’s practical Sound Choices Program these new retirement and income solutions provide advisors with the tools they need to help their clients transition from the pre-retirement phase to the post-retirement phase with a focus on planning for retirement, income and tax and estate planning. Products evolve to meet new needs JustWealth enters group benefits space “Today a growing number of investors are turning to their advisors for help with the challenges of planning for retirement,” says Gordon Forrester, executive vice president, product and marketing and head of Retail. “With this in mind, the next phase of our Sound Choices Program was developed to give advisors timely information and useful content to help their clients make informed decisions about retirement.” Retire Smart was developed in partnership with the Knowledge Bureau. Led by author and entrepreneur Evelyn Jacks, the Knowledge Bureau is a national educational institute providing certificate training and professional development at a post-secondary level for advisors in the tax and financial services industry. While not intended by AGF to provide investors with financial or tax advice, Retire Smart offers a client-centric approach to planning for tax-efficient accumulation, growth, capital preservation and transition of wealth. It includes online calculators and advisor and investor tools. The tools are divided into three categories: resources to help gather information about clients’ needs with a link back to appropriate solutions; tools to clarify a range of concepts from investment basics to drawing income in a tax-efficient manner with a connection back to AGF product categories and funds; and materials to help clients stay invested and transitional wealth planning. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

June 12, 2021

Sawmill Operators Complying With Licensing Regulations

first_imgRelatedAgriculture Ministry Endorses H2K Organic Stimulants The Forestry Department is reporting that sawmill operators are complying with regulations for them to license their milling operations.Legal Officer at the department, Rainee Oliphant, said the response to the requirement for persons to come in and license their operations has been encouraging.“We’ve got just under 90 applications to date and we’ve generated over 70 licences and we are encouraged,” she said at a recent JIS Think Tank.The sawmill licensing regime, which falls under the Forest Regulations, is aimed at regulating the island’s sawmilling industry as well as providing greater protection for the country’s forests.Under the licensing system, which became effective in January, persons who intend to operate sawmills must receive a licence from the Forestry Department. The application fee is $15,000, and once granted, the licence is valid for one calendar year, after which it must be renewed.Miss Oliphant pointed out that in addition to large entities, small one-man operators are also required to have their equipment licensed. Failure to do so can lead to prosecution and/or a fine.She noted that the focus is on persons who are engaged in cutting trees on a commercial basis, and not for private use.“So, the saw man, who is converting trees to board, whether it’s his own trees or he’s hired by an individual, is required to have a licence in order to avoid prosecution,” she informed.Persons who fail to comply with the regulations could be fined up to $50,000 for each offence.  “So, when you look at it, the payment of a $15,000 fee on an annual basis is nothing in comparison to being charged 4, 5, 6 times for not having (a licence),” she pointed out.Miss Oliphant told JIS News that licensing is important not just to strengthen the Forestry Department’s monitoring and management capabilities, but also to have a better grasp of the types of trees that are being cut.“The application (form) looks at the species of trees that are targeted, the number of trees being cut, frequency, quantity of persons hired and therefore allowing us to have a more informed decision-making process going forward,” she noted. Sawmill Operators Complying With Licensing Regulations AgricultureJuly 28, 2015Written by: O. Rodger Hutchinson RelatedPrivate Land Owners Urged To Establish Forests Advertisements Sawmill Operators Complying With Licensing RegulationsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaycenter_img RelatedGov’t Committed to Sugar Sector – Buchanan Photo: Donald DelahayeLegal Officer at the Forestry Department, Rainee Oliphant, addresses a recent JIS Think Tank. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsThe Forestry Department is reporting that sawmill operators are complying with regulations for them to license their milling operations.Legal Officer at the department, Rainee Oliphant, said the response to the requirement for persons to come in and license their operations has been encouraging.The sawmill licensing regime, which falls under the Forest Regulations, is aimed at regulating the island’s sawmilling industry as well as providing greater protection for the country’s forests.last_img read more

October 19, 2020

Allsop moves to take care of investor trend

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

September 28, 2020

Olswang tight-lipped as two law firms reveal BHS fees

first_imgInternational firm Olswang has remained tight-lipped on the fees it received for its work in relation to the sale of retail giant BHS, claiming legal privilege and client confidentiality.However magic circle firm Linklaters and international firm Nabarro have provided the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee with a breakdown of the fees they were paid for their involvement in the sale.All three firms appeared before the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee and Work and Pensions Committee last month in relation to the joint inquiry into the collapse of BHS.Linklaters, which advised Arcadia Group on the sale of BHS, revealed that it has been paid a total of £1.2m so far in relation to its work. A letter to Frank Field MP, chair of the Work and Pensions Committee, shows the firm was paid £627,000 from 12 February 2015, when it was first instructed, to 11 March 2015. The rest of the fees were charged for work done after March 2015. These included advising Arcadia on the post-completion financing of BHS, the subsequent administration of BHS and the select committee inquiries.Linklaters also provided details of the fees charged by Arcadia in relation to other corporate transactions since 2012. These included £900,000 for the sale of 25% of Arcadia’s stake in Topshop and £480,000 for the internal reorganisation of a number of Arcadia’s brands. The firm said that it does not charge success or contingency fees.Meanwhile Nabarro, which advised Taveta Investments, the owner of Arcadia, on the BHS pensions schemes, said it charged £933,000 from when it was first appointed to act for Taveta in 2009 to September 2015 when the firm ceased acting for the group.The firm specified that it charged Taveta £42,000 for advice relating to the sale of the BHS Group. It said the fees were charged on a time-cost basis and that no contingency fees were applied. However Olswang, which advised Retail Acquisitions Limited on its purchase of BHS, said the firm could not provide details of the fees it charged.Paul Stevens, chief executive at Olswang, said: ‘While we wish to be as helpful as possible to the committees […] we are bound by professional obligations regarding legal professional privilege and client confidentiality, which have not been waived by our clients.’In response to a question about what due diligence process it carries to establish the source of fees it is paid, the firm said that it was required to conduct customer due diligence checks and is subject to laws for matters such as anti-money laundering.It said: ‘We do consider the source of funds for payment of our fees in order to ensure that we comply with the laws and professional obligations to which we are subject.’last_img read more